Installation Guide

Note – this is a recommended installation guide. They may not be relevant for every installation, and we recommend that if you are unsure that you seek professional advice.

All of the installation Guide below should be carried out by persons with the necessary trade skills and equipment, again if you are not sure please seek professional advice. Naturally Inspired, accepts No responsibility for any loss or damage to property, Nor any injury or damage to any persons.

Our Brushwood panels are available in 2 thicknesses

  • 50mm thick – [ Fencing panels] for free standing Traditional brushwood boundary fences
  • 30mm thick- [Cladding Panels] to clad old & existing fences and walls.

There are 3 basic types of installation

  • Traditional Brushwood Fence – using 50mm thick panels
  • Post and Rail construction – clad with either 50mm or 30mm Thick panels
  • Cladding – existing fences

 

1. Traditional Brushwood fence – (50mm thick panels)

  • Post Installation

    *Use 40mm nominal bore galvanized steel posts 2.4m long
    Concrete the posts into the ground and space them 30mm wider than the panels. E.g. the panels are approx. 2.2m long, so the gaps between the posts is 2.230m.
    The height of the post should match the finished height of the panels.
    Concrete to be 600mm deep with a diameter of approx. 300mm, depending on the ground conditions. Slightly dome the concrete at the top to disperse the water.

  • Plinth Installation

    To maintain a consistent and stable height, the brushwood panels should be installed on top of a solid Plinth.
    This plinth can be made of Treated Timber, concrete, or any masonry or limestone block work providing they form a stable base.
    The picture shown illustrates a timber plinth, checked out around the post and secured to the post to maintain stability and height.
    The timber plinth can be fitted once the concrete has set.

  • Top Rail Installation

    With our brushwood panels, installing the top rails is purely optional. Our first wire on the 1.8m high panels is 70mm down from the top and has been strategically located so the capping can be attached to this wire.
    The panels themselves are stitched every 30mm so they are strong enough without the top rail.
    Fitting the top rail is purely a personal choice for added strength.
    Once the concrete has set, attach the top rail by tek screwing through the rail and into the galvanized steel post cap.

  • Brushwood Panel Installation

    *Place the panels between the post, and using 2.0mm dia galvanized wire tie the panels back to the steel posts. Min 4 ties per panel

  • Covering the post

    Insert 2.0mm dia wire 400mm long through the brushwood panels, 30- 50mm back from the end of the panels, and locate at every horizontal wire.
    (You may need to use a screwdriver to temporary create a hole through the panels for the wire to pass through)
    With a small clump of brushwood, taken out of the end of an offcut or spare panel, position this around the vertical post and secure this using the 2.0mm wire. Repeat this on the other side of the panel before twitching the ends of the wires together.

  • Installing the Capping

    Capping is Available as bundles of tea tree sticks, with a wood end and leaf end, or you can use small sections of the brushwood panel

    • Tea Tree Capping
      Place a series of 2.0 mm dia galvanized wire approx. 40 cm apart through the brushwood panels and under the top wire.
      Place your bundle of tea tree capping on top of the brushwood panels and loosely tie down with a couple of the wires. Allow enough room to position all the sticks horizontally down either side and over the top.
      Once you are happy, loosely tie down the rest of the wires leaving the leaf end.
      Position the next bundle of capping on top with the wood end adjacent to the leaf end of the previous bundle. Repeat the steps before, except once you have all your sticks positioned horizontally weave some of the outside sticks over the leaf end and back into the first bundle of capping. This is to establish a consistency of wood and leaf throughout the whole fence line. Repeat these steps until you have covered the tops of all the panels. Once this has been done tightly tie down all the wires turning the loose ends back into the brush.
      The only thing to do now, is to trim off any loose ends which may be protruding. This can be done with any pruners or a whipper snipper, for the more adventurous.
      Take your time fitting your brushwood, a nicely installed brushwood fence with a consistent roll top capping, will give you a real sense of achievement.
    • Capping using Sections of the panel
      If it is your preference to use sections of the brushwood panel, and for most people they find this is the easier option, you simply cut the panels into sections of 180-200mm wide depending on how large you would like your capping to be. You would do this by cutting the horizontal wires in the panels to the exact length.
      Separate each section and remove all the wires.
      You now have very consistent size bundles of brushwood that you would place over the top of the top rail and down the sides to the top horizontal wire in the panels.
      With a series of 2.0mm galvanized wires (approx. 20 -30cm apart) in position under the top wire, and through the brushwood panels – tie down each bundle of brush so they form a consistent roll on top.
      Butt each bundle of brush up to each other, slightly pushing each bundle into the other to form a consistent diameter throughout the length of the fence line.
    • Cleaning Up
      When installing a brushwood fence, there are often a large amount of wire and brushwood offcuts left over. To avoid any injuries, take care and make sure you clean the area thoroughly.

2. Post and Rail construction

There are basically 2 different types of post and rail construction. You can either install the horizontal rails across the front of the posts and install the brushwood panels continuously along the fence line.
Alternatively you set the horizontal rails to the back of the posts so the panels fit in between the posts.

The posts we recommend to use are 125 x 75 treated pine – spaced at a maximum 2.4m centres. If you are installing the panels between the post, the spacing between the post should be the width of the panels.
The rails used should be 90 x 45 treated pine – dry after
The plinth should be 90 x 45 treated pine – dry after
When fixing to treated pine always use class 3 or purpose made screws for treated pine.

  • For standard timber frame construction

Start by concreting your posts in at the required centres and to a height 100 mm shorter than the panel height. The concrete should be to a depth of 600mm with a diameter of approx. 300mm.[ allow the correct time for your concrete to set properly]
Install your plinth at ground level and fix to the face of your posts.
Measure the centre of your rails so they are located at the height of the 2nd wire down from the top or the second wire up from the bottom of your brushwood panels. Mark these positions on your posts, a check out the timber posts to a depth and width so your rails are now neatly housed into the posts and flush with the face of your posts.

  • Installing the panels

    Regardless of whether you are using 30 of 50mm thick panels, the method of fixing is the same
    Using either Gerard ring fasteners, or wire netting Clips, fit 5 clips equally spaced across the second wire down from the top and the second wire up from the bottom [ 10 clips in total]
    Remember these are the same wires you located your rails heights to.
    Close clips to for a tight circle around the wires.
    With your brushwood panel now stood up against your fence, screw through your clips using a min 50mm long pan head screws for the 30mm thick panels, and min 75mm long screws for the 50mm thick panels.

  • Joining your panels together

    From the end of one panel, simply cut the stitching wires that hold the horizontal wires together, and remove a small amount of brushwood from this end.
    With the next panel positioned alongside you can now join the horizontal wires together.
    Once this has been done, with a pointy pair of wire cutters cut the stitching wires of the second panels and work the brush into each other until the join is seamless.
    You can now secure the second panel back to the rails, and repeat the process until you have fitted all of your panels.

  • Installing the Capping

    Installing the capping is recommended however with this type of construction it is optional and a personal choice.
    If you decide to install the capping, please refer to the previous Traditional Brushwood Fence section.

  • Cleaning up

    When installing a brushwood fence, there are often a large amount of wire and brushwood offcuts left over. To avoid any injuries, take care and make sure you clean the area thoroughly.

3. Cladding Panels – (30mm thick panels)

Cladding panels are often used to cover existing fences and to create privacy screens as well as to hide some of those ugly areas of our gardens.This is an installation guide to cover 2 of the most popular uses for these panels, and that is to cover existing hardie and colour bond fences.

These panels can be attached directly onto the existing fences, but you should inspect your fence and make sure they are sound enough, and still in a vertical position.

Attaching panels to a leaning fence is not recommended, and will only add weight to the fence.

  • Plinth Installation

    To maintain a consistent height and support the weight of the panels a treated timber plinth is installed underneath.

    • Colour bond
      Use a 70 x 35mm treated pine plinth. The plinth is cut out around the post leaving 40mm protruding to support the brushwood panel. Fix the rail back to the post using metal tek screws. [See diagram below] Ensure the plinth is sitting on the ground and is fully supported throughout the whole length.
    • Hardie Fence
      Screed the ground over its entire length to the height and levelness you require.
      Using a 70 x 35mm treated timber plinth, position the plinth hard up against the fence and hold in place with 50 x 25 treated
  • Installing the Battens

    2 x battens should be installed horizontally. Locate the bottom batten centrally at the height of the 2nd wire up in the brushwood panel, and the top batten similarly to be located centrally at the height of the 2nd wire down from the top in the brushwood panel.

    • Colour bond
      Using 2 x 70 x 19 treated pine battens, rebate the end of the battens so the fit behind the post, with the face of the batten flush with the face of the post. [See diagram]
    • Hardie Fence
      Using 2 x 50 x 25 treated pine rails, secure the battens with 5mm dia gutter bolts and hardies diamond washers. Pre drill your battens every 1m and with a small flat punch or even a Phillip head screw driver, using a reasonable force punch your holes through the fence.

[Remember you must never drill or create dust with an asbestos hardie fence.]

Alternatively – you can install vertical Jambs in between the S shape of the hardie fence and attach these jambs at the top to your capping, whilst cementing them in at the bottom. To these jambs you can then screw your battens, to avoiding punching any holes in your fence.

  • Installing Brushwood Cladding Panels.

    Regardless what type of fence you are covering, attaching the brushwood panels to the battens is the same.
    Using either Gerard ring fasteners, or wire netting Clips (from your local hardware) fit 5 clips equally spaced across the second wire down from the top and up from the bottom. (10 clips in total)
    Remember these are the same wires that you located your battens heights to.
    Close the clip ends together until the clip forms a tight circle around the horizontal wire.
    With your brushwood panel now stood up against your fence, screw through your clips and the brushwood panel, into the battens behind. (Use 50mm long pan head tek screws)

  • Joining your Panels Together

    If you would like a continuous look with your brushwood cladding panels. From the end of one panel, simply cut the stitching wires that hold the horizontal wires together, and remove a small amount of brushwood from this end. With the next panel positioned alongside you can now join the horizontal wires together. Once this has been done, with a pointy pair of wire cutters cut the stitching wires of the second panel and work the brush in together until the join is seamless.
    Once this has been done, you can join this second panel back to the battens. Repeat this process until the end.

  • Fitting the Capping

    Fitting Capping to your cladding panels is more of a personal choice. It is not necessary for strength. Capping will however protect the ends of the brush from fraying and deteriorating.
    If you would like to fit capping, please follow the same process above in the Traditional Brushwood Fence.

  • Safety

    When cutting, or working in general with treated timber, it is important that you make yourself aware of all the safety issues. Please check all the current information available from your local timber supplier before you start.
    When working with asbestos you should seek the current safety advice and never cut or drill asbestos, and abide by all the proper precautions.